The Annapolis Valley

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Annapolis Royal

Creation of Annapolis Royal

In 1710, Port Royal was captured a final time from the French at the Siege of Port Royal during Queen Anne's War, marking the British conquest of mainland Nova Scotia.[1] The British renamed the town Annapolis Royal and Fort Anne after Queen Anne (1665–1714), the reigning monarch. The Annapolis Basin, Annapolis River, Annapolis County, and the Annapolis Valley all take their name from the town. Annapolis Royal is situated in a good but shallow harbor at the western end of the fertile Annapolis Valley, nestled between the North and South mountains which define the valley. The town is on south bank of the Annapolis River facing the heavily tidal Annapolis Basin. The riverside forms the waterfront for this historic town. Directly opposite Annapolis Royal on the northern bank of the river is the community of Granville Ferry. Allains Creek joins the Annapolis River at the town, defining the western side of the community. The Bay of Fundy is just over the North Mountain, 10 kilometers north of the town.
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About The Town of Annapolis Royal,

The Town of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia is the perfect place to plan your next vacation, holiday or family get-together! A small sea-side Town steeped in history and tradition, Annapolis Royal and its residents know how to treat a visitor. After all, we have been doing it for more then 400 years! Other small towns have nothing on Nova Scotia's Annapolis Royal. When we say everything is within walking distance, we mean it! The Town itself offers a host of activities and events that can keep you busy for the duration of your stay, all in a 2 km radius. Add together all the other attractions and activites in the area (within 30 minutes) and you could spend your entire summer in the area, without repeating the same activity. Idyllically situated between mountain and sea, Annapolis Royal offers a stunning waterfront shopping area, an enviable selection of restaurants and world class accommodations plus a streetscape that has been designated a National Historic District and icon Nova Scotia tourism. Important heritage sites, an exciting arts community and theatre, together with wonderful recreational opportunities all combine to make Annapolis Royal the ideal holiday destination!
 The Annpolis Valley, is located in the western part of the Nova Scotia peninsula, formed by a trough between two parallel mountain ranges along the shore of the Bay of Fundy. Statistics Canada defines the Annapolis Valley as an economic region, composed of Annapolis County, Kings County, and Hants County. The valley measures approximately 126 kilometres (78 mi) in length from Digby and the Annapolis Basin in the west to Wolfville and the Minas Basin in the east, spanning the counties of Digby, Annapolis and Kings. The shelter provided by these two mountainous ridges has produced a "micro climate" which provides relatively mild temperatures for the region and, coupled with the fertile glacial sedimentary soils on the valley floor, the region is conducive to growing vegetable and fruit crops. Particularly famous for its apple crop, the valley hosts in excess of 1,000 farms of various types, the majority being relatively small family- owned operations. Within the valley itself are two "major" rivers, the Annapolis River which flows west from the Caribou Bog in the central part of the valley into the Annapolis Basin, and the Cornwallis River which flows east from Caribou Bog into the Minas Basin. The North Mountain ridge forms the north side of the Annapolis Valley. Also flowing east, in two smaller valleys north of the Cornwallis River, are the Canard River and the Habitant River, both of which also flow into the Minas Basin
The Valley has been traditionally built on a diversified agricultural industry, with a wide range of output ranging from livestock to fruit trees and berries. The last quarter century has also seen the development of a wine industry, with such notable wineries as Gaspereau Vineyards winning national and international awards for their produce. Today, the Valley is still largely dominated by agriculture but also has a growing diversity in its economies, partly aided by the importance of post-secondary education centres provided by Acadia University in Wolfville. Tourism is also an important industry and the Annapolis Valley is known for its scenic farmland, although today some is threatened with suburban development in the eastern end, and a great deal has been abandoned. The Annapolis Valley additionally has become home to the majority of Nova Scotia wineries, located in either the Gaspereau Valley or in the Canning, Grand Pré, or Bear River areas. The Valley is home to the annual Apple Blossom Festival, held in late spring. In July is the annual Steer Bar-B-Que in Kingston, and Heart of the Valley Festival in Middleton. August sees Mud Creek Days in Wolfville and the Annapolis Valley Exhibition in Lawrencetown. Bridgetown's Cider Festival comes in mid-September. The Canadian Deep Roots Music Festival is held each year at the end of September in Wolfville, a community-based festival, supported by both The Town of Wolfville and Acadia University. In the fall the Pumpkin People in Kentville entice the imagination.
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Annapolis Royal

The Annapolis Valley

annapolis royal golf logo
The original French settlement at present-day Port Royal was settled in 1605

Creation of Annapolis Royal

In 1710, Port Royal was captured a final time from the French at the Siege of Port Royal during Queen Anne's War, marking the British conquest of mainland Nova Scotia.[1] The British renamed the town Annapolis Royal and Fort Anne after Queen Anne (1665–1714), the reigning monarch. The Annapolis Basin, Annapolis River, Annapolis County, and the Annapolis Valley all take their name from the town. Annapolis Royal is situated in a good but shallow harbor at the western end of the fertile Annapolis Valley, nestled between the North and South mountains which define the valley. The town is on south bank of the Annapolis River facing the heavily tidal Annapolis Basin. The riverside forms the waterfront for this historic town. Directly opposite Annapolis Royal on the northern bank of the river is the community of Granville Ferry. Allains Creek joins the Annapolis River at the town, defining the western side of the community. The Bay of Fundy is just over the North Mountain, 10 kilometers north of the town.
Learn more about Annapolis Royal Learn more about Annapolis Royal
 The Annpolis Valley, is located in the western part of the Nova Scotia peninsula, formed by a trough between two parallel mountain ranges along the shore of the Bay of Fundy. Statistics Canada defines the Annapolis Valley as an economic region, composed of Annapolis County, Kings County, and Hants County. The valley measures approximately 126 kilometres (78 mi) in length from Digby and the Annapolis Basin in the west to Wolfville and the Minas Basin in the east, spanning the counties of Digby, Annapolis and Kings. The shelter provided by these two mountainous ridges has produced a "micro climate" which provides relatively mild temperatures for the region and, coupled with the fertile glacial sedimentary soils on the valley floor, the region is conducive to growing vegetable and fruit crops. Particularly famous for its apple crop, the valley hosts in excess of 1,000 farms of various types, the majority being relatively small family-owned operations. Within the valley itself are two "major" rivers, the Annapolis River which flows west from the Caribou Bog in the central part of the valley into the Annapolis Basin, and the Cornwallis River which flows east from Caribou Bog into the Minas Basin. The North Mountain ridge forms the north side of the Annapolis Valley. Also flowing east, in two smaller valleys north of the Cornwallis River, are the Canard River and the Habitant River, both of which also flow into the Minas Basin

About The Town of Annapolis Royal,

The Town of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia is the perfect place to plan your next vacation, holiday or family get-together! A small sea-side Town steeped in history and tradition, Annapolis Royal and its residents know how to treat a visitor. After all, we have been doing it for more then 400 years! Other small towns have nothing on Nova Scotia's Annapolis Royal. When we say everything is within walking distance, we mean it! The Town itself offers a host of activities and events that can keep you busy for the duration of your stay, all in a 2 km radius. Add together all the other attractions and activites in the area (within 30 minutes) and you could spend your entire summer in the area, without repeating the same activity. Idyllically situated between mountain and sea, Annapolis Royal offers a stunning waterfront shopping area, an enviable selection of restaurants and world class accommodations plus a streetscape that has been designated a National Historic District and icon Nova Scotia tourism. Important heritage sites, an exciting arts community and theatre, together with wonderful recreational opportunities all combine to make Annapolis Royal the ideal holiday destination!
The Valley has been traditionally built on a diversified agricultural industry, with a wide range of output ranging from livestock to fruit trees and berries. The last quarter century has also seen the development of a wine industry, with such notable wineries as Gaspereau Vineyards winning national and international awards for their produce. Today, the Valley is still largely dominated by agriculture but also has a growing diversity in its economies, partly aided by the importance of post-secondary education centres provided by Acadia University in Wolfville. Tourism is also an important industry and the Annapolis Valley is known for its scenic farmland, although today some is threatened with suburban development in the eastern end, and a great deal has been abandoned. The Annapolis Valley additionally has become home to the majority of Nova Scotia wineries, located in either the Gaspereau Valley or in the Canning, Grand Pré, or Bear River areas. The Valley is home to the annual Apple Blossom Festival, held in late spring. In July is the annual Steer Bar-B-Que in Kingston, and Heart of the Valley Festival in Middleton. August sees Mud Creek Days in Wolfville and the Annapolis Valley Exhibition in Lawrencetown. Bridgetown's Cider Festival comes in mid- September. The Canadian Deep Roots Music Festival is held each year at the end of September in Wolfville, a community-based festival, supported by both The Town of Wolfville and Acadia University. In the fall the Pumpkin People in Kentville entice the imagination.
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Port-Royal under the French soon became self-sufficient and grew modestly for nearly a century,  though it was subject to frequent attacks and capture by British military forces or its New England colonists, only to be restored each time to French control by subsequent recapture or treaty stipulations. Acadia remained in French hands throughout most of the 17th century.

The Annapolis Valley

Annapolis Royal

Port Royal
GOLF

Creation of Annapolis Royal

In 1710, Port Royal was captured a final time from the French at the Siege of Port Royal during Queen Anne's War, marking the British conquest of mainland Nova Scotia.[1] The British renamed the town Annapolis Royal and Fort Anne after Queen Anne (1665–1714), the reigning monarch. The Annapolis Basin, Annapolis River, Annapolis County, and the Annapolis Valley all take their name from the town. Annapolis Royal is situated in a good but shallow harbor at the western end of the fertile Annapolis Valley, nestled between the North and South mountains which define the valley. The town is on south bank of the Annapolis River facing the heavily tidal Annapolis Basin. The riverside forms the waterfront for this historic town. Directly opposite Annapolis Royal on the northern bank of the river is the community of Granville Ferry. Allains Creek joins the Annapolis River at the town, defining the western side of the community. The Bay of Fundy is just over the North Mountain, 10 kilometers north of the town.
Learn more about Annapolis Royal Learn more about Annapolis Royal

About The Town of Annapolis

Royal,

The Town of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia is the perfect place to plan your next vacation, holiday or family get-together! A small sea-side Town steeped in history and tradition, Annapolis Royal and its residents know how to treat a visitor. After all, we have been doing it for more then 400 years! Other small towns have nothing on Nova Scotia's Annapolis Royal. When we say everything is within walking distance, we mean it! The Town itself offers a host of activities and events that can keep you busy for the duration of your stay, all in a 2 km radius. Add together all the other attractions and activites in the area (within 30 minutes) and you could spend your entire summer in the area, without repeating the same activity. Idyllically situated between mountain and sea, Annapolis Royal offers a stunning waterfront shopping area, an enviable selection of restaurants and world class accommodations plus a streetscape that has been designated a National Historic District and icon Nova Scotia tourism. Important heritage sites, an exciting arts community and theatre, together with wonderful recreational opportunities all combine to make Annapolis Royal the ideal holiday destination!
 The Annpolis Valley, is located in the western part of the Nova Scotia peninsula, formed by a trough between two parallel mountain ranges along the shore of the Bay of Fundy. Statistics Canada defines the Annapolis Valley as an economic region, composed of Annapolis County, Kings County, and Hants County. The valley measures approximately 126 kilometres (78 mi) in length from Digby and the Annapolis Basin in the west to Wolfville and the Minas Basin in the east, spanning the counties of Digby, Annapolis and Kings. The shelter provided by these two mountainous ridges has produced a "micro climate" which provides relatively mild temperatures for the region and, coupled with the fertile glacial sedimentary soils on the valley floor, the region is conducive to growing vegetable and fruit crops. Particularly famous for its apple crop, the valley hosts in excess of 1,000 farms of various types, the majority being relatively small family-owned operations. Within the valley itself are two "major" rivers, the Annapolis River which flows west from the Caribou Bog in the central part of the valley into the Annapolis Basin, and the Cornwallis River which flows east from Caribou Bog into the Minas Basin. The North Mountain ridge forms the north side of the Annapolis Valley. Also flowing east, in two smaller valleys north of the Cornwallis River, are the Canard River and the Habitant River, both of which also flow into the Minas Basin
The Valley has been traditionally built on a diversified agricultural industry, with a wide range of output ranging from livestock to fruit trees and berries. The last quarter century has also seen the development of a wine industry, with such notable wineries as Gaspereau Vineyards winning national and international awards for their produce. Today, the Valley is still largely dominated by agriculture but also has a growing diversity in its economies, partly aided by the importance of post-secondary education centres provided by Acadia University in Wolfville. Tourism is also an important industry and the Annapolis Valley is known for its scenic farmland, although today some is threatened with suburban development in the eastern end, and a great deal has been abandoned. The Annapolis Valley additionally has become home to the majority of Nova Scotia wineries, located in either the Gaspereau Valley or in the Canning, Grand Pré, or Bear River areas. The Valley is home to the annual Apple Blossom Festival, held in late spring. In July is the annual Steer Bar-B-Que in Kingston, and Heart of the Valley Festival in Middleton. August sees Mud Creek Days in Wolfville and the Annapolis Valley Exhibition in Lawrencetown. Bridgetown's Cider Festival comes in mid-September. The Canadian Deep Roots Music Festival is held each year at the end of September in Wolfville, a community- based festival, supported by both The Town of Wolfville and Acadia University. In the fall the Pumpkin People in Kentville entice the imagination.
Learn more about Annapolis Valley Learn more about Annapolis Valley